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Archive for the ‘Labor and Employment’ Category

We’ve bailed out the banks, we’ve bailed out insurance companies, we’re bailing out the auto industry … you’d think by now that even the most die-hard Libertarians among us would throw up their hands and admit that some regulation of industry is good.
Well, not Richard Epstein, a Law Professor at the University of Chicago, who, [...]

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Long Island Business News recently published an article concerning new laws that are going into effect this year that will affect business and consumers. Here they are in capsule summary form, but you can also check out the article for more detail:

Repeal of the no-prejudice rule that allowed insurers to deny coverage if the insured failed [...]

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Starbucks, that ubiquitous high-end coffee company based in Seattle, has long tried to convey an image of corporate social responsibility. But that reputation is being put through the wringer by a messy labor dispute with workers – known as baristas – who wish to unionize. According to Businessweek:
The National Labor Relations Board found on Dec. 23 that [...]

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The official numbers are that 5,400 people are killed on the job each year and more than 4 million are injured. Some experts say that these statistics are inaccurate and that up to 13 million workers are injured each year. The Democratic Policy Committee website notes that hispanics workers are 12% more likely to be injured than [...]

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More and more of a problem these days from a consumer standpoint are arbitration clauses. You see them in credit card agreements and now, more and more often, in employment contracts.
What does this mean? Well, if you are subjected to discrimination on the job or have any other employment-related grievance you will find the courthouse [...]

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In keeping tabs of the goings-on in New York courts, it is worth mentioning that two appellate courts, in decisions issued within 4 days of one another, substantially reduced jury verdicts.
The jury system is fundamental to our system of justice. The jury that we are accustomed to, comprised of members of the community who together resolve legal [...]

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Jonathan Turley, the George Washington Law Professor frequently on “Countdown with Keith Olbermann,” writes on his blog about a story he picked up in a Canadian newspaper about a 44-year old stripper, Kimberlee Ouwroulis, who is suing a club that fired her for age discrimination.
Turley notes that the key legal question is whether age is a [...]

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There is a good article in the New Jersey Law Journal, “Dying for a Paycheck: Body Count Rises as Workers Fall,” by Mark LeWinter, Esq. of Anapol Schwartz in Philadelphia, about falling accidents at construction accidents, but since it’s password-protected, unfortunately I can’t link to it. 
Statistics from article, which focuses on the prevalence of injuries to [...]

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Beginning last Monday night, I started volunteering with an excellent program at the New York City Bar Association called “Monday Night Law.” The attorney volunteers (such as myself) provide free legal counseling on Monday evenings for low-income city residents on a variety of topics such as bankruptcy, consumer issues, matrimonial, basic employment and landlord-tenant. 
While we cannot [...]

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For Manhattan residents, getting speedy delivery in minutes to your door is a way of life. But for restaurant deliverymen who worked at the Saigon Grill, a Chinese restaurant with locations on the West Side and Greenwich Village, it took quite a bit longer – in fact, 9 years for some – to obtain compensation for wage violations.
Finding violations of [...]

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